Guides: Prairie And Meadow Styles

 

Great Daffodils that Come Back Every Year

Naturalizing bulbs is a terrific way to brighten up lawns, prairies or meadows in spring. They also make gardening easy. Once planted, there is nothing left to do: these bulbs can stay right where they are and produce flowers year after year. What could be better?

Galanthus (Snowdrops)

There are 20 different Snowdrop species and several hundreds of hybrids. Yes, several hundreds (!). The craze known as Galanthophilia has swept through the ranks of gardening enthusiasts in the past few years. While all snowdrops look the same to the uninitiated - dainty, nodding white flowers, with a dab of green, held on a thin arching stalk at the end of a thicker stem - they reveal their differences when you take a closer look.

Ipheion (Spring Starflower)

Robust and hardy, Ipheion (Spring Starflower) are small bulbous perennials with lovely star-shaped, sweet violet scented flowers borne on long slender scapes in mid to late spring. Blooming for up to 8 weeks, the dainty blossoms rise atop a cushion of narrow, pale, delicate and grass-like leaves. Regarded to be one of the easiest bulbs to grow

Camassia (Camas)

Native to North America, Camassias (Camas) are bulbous perennials with long racemes of up to 100 star-shaped flowers, adorned with six slender loose petals, a green center and bright yellow stamens. The flowers vary in color from pale lilac or white to deep purple or blue-violet. Borne on stout, willowy stems, they open sequentially from bottom to top for a long lasting display.

Asclepias (Milkweed)

Mostly native to the U.S. and Canada, Asclepias include over 100 species of evergreen or deciduous perennials adorned with clusters of small, interestingly shaped blooms that are irresistible to butterflies. Attractive and easy to grow, they shine in many perennial gardens and are a key component of butterfly gardens, cottage gardens, or prairies and meadows.

Trilliums

One of the most beloved of the spring woodland wildflowers, Trilliums (Wake Robin) are remarkable rhizomatous perennials with unbranched stems, noted for the perfect symmetry of their leaves, petals and sepals which all come in groups of three, hence the genus name. Their blooms can be either showy or discrete, their foliage handsomely mottled. Jewels of the shade garden, they are fully hardy and will blossom and blend beautifully with other woodland plants.

Great Daffodils for Southern Gardens

Narcissus (Daffodils) are among the easiest bulbs to grow and regarded as some of the most valuable spring bulbs for the South. Long lived, they naturalize and multiply year after year. Versatile, they offer a fascinating array of flower forms, sizes, and colors. They also make gardening easy. Once planted, there is nothing left to do: these bulbs can stay right where they are and produce flowers year after year.

Most Fragrant Daffodils

If you look for more than a beautiful drift of creamy or golden flowers, and wish to add another terrific dimension to your spring garden, plant fragrant Narcissus cultivars. While many daffodil bulbs are fragrant, most do not have a perfume powerful enough to enjoy unless you stick your nose directly into the bulb. The following daffodils are regarded as the most fragrant. Grow them close to where you sit in the garden, or along paths to savor their sweet fragrance as you pass by.

Best Daffodils For Your Garden and Containers

The following daffodils are recipients of both the Award of Garden Merit and the Wister Award, two highly coveted and prestigious awards. These super-daffodils have proven to be vigorous, sturdy and reliably perennial. They include many different flower shapes and bloom seasons. If you plant a few of each variety, you will get weeks and weeks of spring color every year! Some are delightfully fragrant. Grow them close to where you sit in the garden, or along paths to savor their sweet fragrance as you pass by.

Pretty Tulips that Come Back Every Year

Many tulips are not strongly perennial and their floral display tends to decline from season to season. They bloom well the first year, but then peter out after a couple of years. But if you select the right tulip varieties, plant them in the right spot and provide the proper care, you can be rewarded with a magnificent spring display year after year.

Helleborus (Hellebores)

There are 17 Hellebore species. Most are native to the mountainous regions of Europe, especially the Balkan region of the former Yugoslavia, south along the eastern Adriatic to Greece and Turkey. Many of the species have been interbred, producing countless hybrid Hellebores in a rich array of colors and forms.

Create a Garden with Great Winter Interest

Winters may be long and cold, but your garden can allay that dreariness and be transformed into a place of natural beauty with visually arresting textures, colors, fragrance and flowers. To create such a beautiful winter scene, you need to make sure you select the right plants.

Pretty Flowers for your Winter Garden

Most people celebrate daffodils as the harbingers of spring, without being aware that many other plants flower much earlier

Helenium (Sneezeweed)

Native to North America and Central America, Helenium is a great perennial for the late season garden as it provides weeks of splashes of color, from early summer to early fall, when many other perennials are starting to fade.

Which Birch to Choose for my Garden?

Impervious to cold and wet, low maintenance and deer resistant, birches are terrific additions to the landscape. Often grown as specimen trees, they look spectacular when planted in groups of three or more.

Veronicastrum virginicum (Culver's Root)

Extremely showy, Veronicastrum virginicum (Culver's Root) introduces elegant vertical lines to the borders with its long spikes of densely-clustered, tiny flowers from summer to fall. With a candelabra look, these attractive inflorescences, in shades of white, blue, pink and purple, are nicely complemented by lanceolate, dark-green leaves that are arranged in whorls around the stem.

Top Daylilies - A list of Your Favorite Hemerocallis

AHS conducts a popularity poll each year among its members to determine the favorite daylilies from each region. The goal of this poll is to provide a true view of which daylilies perform well in a given area and which are favored by gardeners. Here is a compilation of the top favorite daylilies in North America

Hamamelis (Witch Hazel)

Hardy, low maintenance, and ignored by most pests, Hamamelis (Witch Hazel) are deciduous shrubs or small trees of great beauty, particularly when their showy, fragrant flowers are on full display.

Miscanthus sinensis (Japanese Silver Grass)

Adding drama and powerful structure to the landscape, Miscanthus sinensis (Japanese Silver Grass) are fabulous ornamental grasses that should have a spot in any garden. Traditionally used in Japan in decorative art and gardens, Miscanthus made a royal entrance into occidental gardens about a century ago, thanks to the spectacular feathery plumes towering above their graceful arching foliage and their year-long interest in the garden.

Anthemis tinctoria (Golden Marguerite)

Eye-catching, Anthemis tinctoria is a vigorous perennial that will light up your garden throughout summer with its abundant blooms of shining golden yellow flowers atop a fragrant lacy foliage.

Kniphofia (Red Hot Poker)

Kniphofias, commonly known as Torch Lilies or Red Hot Pokers, always make a bold statement in the garden with their brilliant show of bright-colored, dense, erect spikes resembling glowing pokers or torches. Blooming from late spring to early fall, depending on the varieties, their stately flowers are noted for their long-lasting display of reds, oranges, yellows or creams, adding eye-catching splashes of color to any border.

Japanese Anemones

Fall-blooming anemones have earned their place in the fall garden with their charming flowers floating above the border as summer plants are starting to fade

Great Companion Plants for your Daylilies

Fabulous at creating a brilliantly colored perennial garden, their display can be further enhanced and spiced up with the addition of other perennial plants.

Fabulous Reblooming Daylilies

Daylilies have a relatively short blooming period, 1 to 5 weeks and depending on their variety and your area, they may bloom from early spring until frost. Some varieties are 'reblooming'. These daylilies bloom more than one time during a single season. Some of these bloom early (e.g., May or June) and then repeat in the fall. Others have a succession of bloom periods, one shortly after another for several months. Here is a selection of pretty Daylily cultivars prized for their ability to rebloom.