Hardiness Zone 12
Alphabetical Plant Listing

Guides: Hardiness Zone 12


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Paphiopedilum (Slipper Orchids)

Originating in the jungles of the Far East including Indonesia, Paphiopedilum (Slipper Orchids) are semi-terrestrial orchids, growing in humus and other material on the forest floor, on cliffs in pockets of humus and occasionally in trees. Paphiopedilums are called Slipper Orchids because of their unique floral pouch. Resilient and easy to grow in the home, they are probably the easiest orchids to rebloom, or at least to keep alive.

Phalaenopsis (Moth Orchids)

Phalaenopsis (Moth Orchids) is a genus of 60 species and several natural hybrids growing in tropical Asia to the Pacific Islands and Australia. These orchids are usually epiphytic (growing on trees), but occasionally lithophytic (growing on rocks) or terrestrial. They are among the most popular cultivated orchids and thousands of hybrids have been made throughout the years.

Dendrobium (Orchids)

Dendrobium is a diverse genus of more than 1000 orchids species distributed throughout tropical and subtropical Asia, the islands of the south Pacific and Australia. These orchids are usually epiphytic (growing on trees), lithophytic (growing on rocks) and rarely terrestrial. Since the Dendrobium genus is so large and complex, the cultural requirements of these spectacular orchids will depend on their native habitat and the section of the genus to which they belong.

Oncidium (Dancing Lady Orchids)

Oncidium is an incredibly large and diverse genus of about 300 orchids species distributed throughout tropical and subtropical America. These orchids have been nicknamed the Dancing Lady Orchids because their flowers resemble a small dancer with a colorful skirt. Relatively trouble free, these orchids are attractive plants for the home or greenhouse. They are sometimes described as difficult to grow. However, with proper care, it is possible to grow them relatively easily.

Cattleya (Corsage Orchids)

Cattleya Orchids are among the most popular and easy-to-grow orchids. Epiphytes (growing on trees) or lithophytes (growing on rocks), they include about 50 species and numerous hybrids in a variety of colors. Native to Central and South America, they are divided into two groups, the unifoliates, which have one leaf and large flowers, and the bifoliates, which have two leaves per stem and smaller flowers. Both types are very fragrant with showy flowers appearing on naked stems and lasting 4-8 weeks.

Cymbidium (Boat Orchids)

Among the oldest horticultural orchids in the world, Cymbidiums have been grown and revered in China for thousands of years. Prized for their incredibly decorative flower spikes, used especially as cut flowers or for corsages in the spring, they are among the most popular orchids in cultivation today. Most Cymbidiums are easily grown. They are one of the least demanding indoor orchids. They can also be grown in the garden. To flower well, Cymbidiums need a distinct difference between day and night temperatures in late summer.

Vanda (Orchids)

Coveted around the world, Vanda is a genus of 50 orchid species found throughout tropical Asia, into the Philippines, and down to Australia. Prized for their huge and long-lasting flowers, these warm-growing tropical orchids are grown in the millions throughout Asia and in America. Vanda orchids are not a good choice for beginners as many species require bright light, warm temperatures, high humidity, ample water and strong air movement.  Some of these requirements can be difficult to follow at home.

Phragmipedium (Slipper Orchids)

Mostly native to Mexico, Central America and South America, Phragmipedium (Slipper Orchids) is a genus of about 25 species of terrestrial or epiphytic orchids found growing along stream banks of shady mountain slopes at elevations between 7,200-13,000 ft. (2200-3900 m). Easy to grow in the home, as long as you follow an appropriate care routine, Phragmipedium orchids make beautiful plants in the home or greenhouse.

Phaius (Orchids)

In cultivation for hundreds of years, Phaius is a genus of about 50 species of large, warm-growing, terrestrial orchids found in a huge natural range including Africa, Madagascar, Asia, Australia and the Pacific Islands. Easy to grow in the home, as long as you follow an appropriate care routine, these orchids are spectacular plants and make gorgeous houseplants.

Fragrant Orchids, Cattleya, Cymbidium, Dendrobium, Encyclia, Lycaste, Maxillaria, Oncidium, Paphiopedilum, Rhynchostylis, Vanda

Pretty Fragrant Orchids

Aside from their beauty, some orchids exude a wonderful fragrance. Their scent can leave an impression greater than the orchid itself. Most orchids smell best in the morning, their fragrance fading in the afternoon when the temperature increases. Other orchids are fragrant in the evening.

Miltoniopsis (Pansy Orchids)

Native to Costa Rica, Panama, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, Miltoniopsis (Pansy Orchids) is a genus of 5 species and over 2000 hybrids of epiphytic or lithophytic orchids found growing in rain forests and cloud forests at elevations between 1,650-6,500 ft. (500-2,000 m). Resembling garden pansies, smelling like roses and reblooming quickly, these beautiful orchids are enjoying increasing popularity. These orchids are not hard to grow, but when new growth begins, they need adequate care and you must make sure to give them enough water.

Hardiness zones, USDA, USDA Map, Hardiness zones in Australia, Australia Climate, Australia Weather, Regional Gardening

Hardiness Zones in Australia

Australia lies in Plant Hardiness Zones 7 through 12 with some variations across regions and seasons.  5 main regions can be identified in Australia: Arid Region, Cool Mountain Region, Sub-tropical Region, Temperate Region and the Tropical Region.

USA Hardiness Zones, Map of Hardiness Zones, hardiness zones, USDA Hardiness Zones, plant hardiness zones, Regional Gardening, Gardening in the USA

Hardiness Zones in the USA

The USDA Hardiness Zone Map divides North America into 13 zones of 10°F each, ranging from -60°F (-51°C) to 70°F (21°C). If you are planning to buy a shrub, perennial or tree, you need to make sure that this new plant will tolerate year-round conditions in your area.

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