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Guides: Underplanting Roses and Shrubs


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Underplanting roses, Best David Austin Roses, Best roses for borders, Rose borders, Shrub Roses, Rose companion plants, companion planting

Underplanting Roses - Companion Plants for Roses

Roses need friends or companion plants around them for various reasons including pest and disease control, longer season of interest and aesthetics. Below are some basic rules to follow when pairing your favorite roses with other plants.

Tulips for Naturalizing, Tulips that come back, Best Tulips, Naturalizing Bulbs, perennial Bulbs, Perennial Tulips

Pretty Tulips that Come Back Every Year

Many tulips are not strongly perennial and their floral display tends to decline from season to season. They bloom well the first year, but then peter out after a couple of years. But if you select the right tulip varieties, plant them in the right spot and provide the proper care, you can be rewarded with a magnificent spring display year after year.

Scilla Varieties

Treasured for their flowers, most Scillas bloom in spring but a few species produce their pretty blooms in late summer or fall.  Which one is for you?

Dicentra (Bleeding Hearts)

Appealing to most gardeners, Dicentra (Bleeding Heart) are rhizomatous or tuberous perennials with heart-shaped flowers dangling in arching panicles or racemes above attractively divided leaves. Shade tolerant, they bloom over a long season, extending from late spring to early fall, in cooler climates. In hotter climates, flowering will usually stop in the heat of the summer, but may start again when the weather cools in late summer or early fall. Beautiful in leaf as soon as they sprout, they quickly add their charming blooms and make elegant additions to the garden when combined with other shade-loving perennials.

Daffodils for Naturalizing, Daffodils that come back, Best Daffodils, Best Narcissus, Naturalizing Bulbs, perennial Bulbs

Great Daffodils that Come Back Every Year

Naturalizing bulbs is a terrific way to brighten up lawns, prairies or meadows in spring. They also make gardening easy. Once planted, there is nothing left to do: these bulbs can stay right where they are and produce flowers year after year. What could be better?

Galanthus (Snowdrops)

There are 20 different Snowdrop species and several hundreds of hybrids. Yes, several hundreds (!). The craze known as Galanthophilia has swept through the ranks of gardening enthusiasts in the past few years. While all snowdrops look the same to the uninitiated - dainty, nodding white flowers, with a dab of green, held on a thin arching stalk at the end of a thicker stem - they reveal their differences when you take a closer look.

Ipheion (Spring Starflower)

Robust and hardy, Ipheion (Spring Starflower) are small bulbous perennials with lovely star-shaped, sweet violet scented flowers borne on long slender scapes in mid to late spring. Blooming for up to 8 weeks, the dainty blossoms rise atop a cushion of narrow, pale, delicate and grass-like leaves. Regarded to be one of the easiest bulbs to grow

Camassia (Camas)

Native to North America, Camassias (Camas) are bulbous perennials with long racemes of up to 100 star-shaped flowers, adorned with six slender loose petals, a green center and bright yellow stamens. The flowers vary in color from pale lilac or white to deep purple or blue-violet. Borne on stout, willowy stems, they open sequentially from bottom to top for a long lasting display.

Most Fragrant Daffodils, Fragrant Daffodils, Fragrant Narcissus, Fragrant Bulbs, Fragrant Spring Bulbs., Best Daffodils, Best Narcissus, Naturalizing Bulbs, perennial Bulbs

Best Daffodils For Your Garden and Containers

The following daffodils are recipients of both the Award of Garden Merit and the Wister Award, two highly coveted and prestigious awards. These super-daffodils have proven to be vigorous, sturdy and reliably perennial. They include many different flower shapes and bloom seasons. If you plant a few of each variety, you will get weeks and weeks of spring color every year! Some are delightfully fragrant. Grow them close to where you sit in the garden, or along paths to savor their sweet fragrance as you pass by.

Daffodils for the South, Daffodils for Warm Climates, Daffodils that come back, Best Daffodils, Best Narcissus, Naturalizing Bulbs, perennial Bulbs

Great Daffodils for Southern Gardens

Narcissus (Daffodils) are among the easiest bulbs to grow and regarded as some of the most valuable spring bulbs for the South. Long lived, they naturalize and multiply year after year. Versatile, they offer a fascinating array of flower forms, sizes, and colors.

Most Fragrant Daffodils, Fragrant Daffodils, Fragrant Narcissus, Fragrant Bulbs, Fragrant Spring Bulbs., Best Daffodils, Best Narcissus, Naturalizing Bulbs, perennial Bulbs

Most Fragrant Daffodils

If you look for more than a beautiful drift of creamy or golden flowers, and wish to add another terrific dimension to your spring garden, plant fragrant Narcissus cultivars. While many daffodil bulbs are fragrant, most do not have a perfume powerful enough to enjoy unless you stick your nose directly into the bulb.

Helleborus (Hellebores)

There are 17 Hellebore species. Most are native to the mountainous regions of Europe, especially the Balkan region of the former Yugoslavia, south along the eastern Adriatic to Greece and Turkey. Many of the species have been interbred, producing countless hybrid Hellebores in a rich array of colors and forms.

Crocus Types & Recommendations

When the crocuses pop up, winter is on the way out! Very few early-flowering bulbous, tuberous and cormous plants are as extensively planted as the Crocus. Indispensable for each and every garden, they join snowdrops, winter aconites and glory-of-the-snow as the very first heralds of spring.

Trilliums

One of the most beloved of the spring woodland wildflowers, Trilliums (Wake Robin) are remarkable rhizomatous perennials with unbranched stems, noted for the perfect symmetry of their leaves, petals and sepals which all come in groups of three, hence the genus name. Their blooms can be either showy or discrete, their foliage handsomely mottled. Jewels of the shade garden, they are fully hardy and will blossom and blend beautifully with other woodland plants.

Double Primroses, Double Primulas, Belarina Series, Primulas,

Double Primroses

Prized by horticulturists since Elizabethan times, Double Primroses have been cherished in English cottage gardens for centuries. How not to be bewitched by their beauty? Often fragrant, the multipetalled blossoms of these perennial plants resemble small roses and are available in a wide range of colors. Very floriferous thanks to their incredible number of buds (one single plant can produce a hundred blooms!), they enjoy a long flowering season extending from mid to late spring. Some cultivars even begin flowering in early spring, providing a long-lasting floral display. Whether planted in the garden border or in containers, they have the effect of stopping passers-by in their tracks. USDA Zones: 3-8

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