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Parrot Tulips

Parrot Tulips, Spring Bulbs, Spring Flowers

Parrot Tulips, Spring Bulbs, Spring Flowers,Tulip Black parrot,Tulip Blue Parrot, Tulip Erna Lindgreen,Tulip  Estella Rijnveld,Tulip Rococo, Tulip Texas Flame, bulbs Design, Late Spring Bulbs
Parrot Tulips

Parrot tulips are a flamboyant and captivating variety known for their large, ruffled, colorful petals. Their unique and vibrant appearance adds a touch of drama and extravagance to any garden or floral arrangement.

These whimsically-shaped, unusually-colored tulips have been developed from mutations of certain late-flowering tulips and tulips in the Triumph group. The petals of these tulips are serrated or ‘fringed’. As the large flowers are exposed to the sun over time, they open so wide that they almost flatten out.

  • The flowers are green as buds, and as they grow, it may seem as if the tulips will remain entirely green forever. But the brilliant colors are revealed as the flower matures and opens, resembling a parrot’s plumage. This is when their black, star-shaped center and bright yellow stamens become apparent.
  • Some varieties are known as ‘bicolored’, but are actually ‘tricolored’ because of their ever-present green color.
  • Blooming in late spring, Parrots Tulips grow up to 14-26 inches tall (35-65 cm) to create dazzling harmonies with other late-season flowering bulbs.
  • They perform best in full sun in rich, fertile, medium moisture, well-drained soils. Prefer areas with cool winters and warm, dry summers.
  • Easy to grow, these tulips are welcomed additions to beds, borders, and containers. For best visual impact, plant in groups (at least 10 to 15 bulbs) or mix them with other flowering bulbs. Excellent as cut flowers!
  • Although the stems of Parrot tulips are fairly strong, the great size of their flowers prompts one to plant them in sheltered spots in the garden. The flowers are somewhat sensitive to long-lasting cold and wet weather effects.
  • To be planted in fall.
  • Tulips contain toxic glycosides, making them deer or rodent resistant. They are toxic to dogs, toxic to cats, and toxic to horses.
  • All tulip parts may cause severe discomfort following ingestion and may cause an allergic skin reaction. Wear gloves and other protective equipment when handling.

A symbol of spring, tulips are the most popular spring bulbs; most gardeners reserve them a spot in the garden or in containers. Grown for their attractive, vibrantly colored flowers, there are currently over 3,000 registered varieties, which are divided into fifteen groups, mostly based on the flower type, size, and blooming period of the tulip.

Guide Information

Hardiness 3 - 8
Heat Zones 1 - 8
Climate Zones 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24
Plant Type Bulbs
Genus Tulipa
Exposure Full Sun
Season of Interest Spring (Late)
Height 1' - 2'
(30cm - 60cm)
Spread 4" (10cm)
Spacing 4" (10cm)
Depth 7" (18cm)
Maintenance Low
Water Needs Average
Soil Type Chalk, Loam, Sand
Soil pH Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Soil Drainage Well-Drained
Characteristics Cut Flowers, Showy
Tolerance Deer, Rabbit
Landscaping Ideas Beds And Borders, Patio And Containers, Edging
Garden Styles City and Courtyard, Informal and Cottage

Most beautiful Parrot Tulips

Tulipa ‘Apricot Parrot’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Black Parrot’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Blue Parrot’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Bright Parrot’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Erna Lindgreen’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Estella Rijnveld’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Flaming Parrot’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Green Wave’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Professor Rontgen’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Rococo’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Super Parrot’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Weber’s Parrot’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘White Parrot’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Parrot King’ (Parrot Tulip)
Tulipa ‘Silver Parrot’ (Parrot Tulip)

Growing Tips

When to Plant: Tulip bulbs should be planted in the fall, 6 to 8 weeks before a hard frost is expected. This is usually during September and October in the Northern Hemisphere.

Choosing Bulbs: Select plump, firm bulbs. Avoid any that are soft, damaged, or show signs of mold.

Preparing the Soil: Tulips prefer well-drained soil. If the soil is heavy clay, add compost or peat moss to improve drainage. A slightly acidic to neutral pH is best.

Planting the Bulbs: Dig holes or a trench if planting in a row, to a depth of about three times the height of the bulb. A good rule of thumb is to plant the bulb 8 inches (20 cm) deep. Place the bulbs with the pointed end up and flat, wider part down.

Spacing: If you’re planting more than one bulb, space them about 4 to 6 inches (10-15 cm) apart for large bulbs or 1 to 2 inches apart for smaller ones. The more space, the larger the bulbs will grow.

Watering: After planting, water thoroughly. Tulips need water to trigger growth.

Sunlight: Plant the bulbs in an area that gets at least 6 hours of sunlight each day.

Fertilizer: During the growing season, inorganic fertilizers are the best choice since they contain the exact proportions and concentrations of nutrients. They also dissolve easily so that plants can absorb them more efficiently. Be careful not to apply too much inorganic fertilizer; excessively rapid growth results in weak plants that are then more vulnerable to diseases and pests. Applying too much fertilizer can also burn plants. Flower bulbs being used for perennial displays and for naturalizing in borders and beneath shrubs will benefit from a weekly application of a potassium-rich liquid fertilizer just as their noses become visible in spring. Feeding can be stopped once leaves begin to yellow and die back.

Care After Flowering: After the tulips bloom, cut off the flower stem but leave the leaves until they yellow and wither. This allows the plant to store energy for next year’s bloom.

Replacing Bulbs: Tulip bulbs don’t always re-flower after their first year (especially hybrids). For a sure show each spring, many gardeners treat them as annuals and plant fresh bulbs each fall.

Pests: Watch out for pests such as rodents, which can eat the bulbs. If pests are a problem in your area, consider planting the bulbs in a wire cage buried in the ground.

Remember that while tulips are beautiful, they can be toxic if ingested, and the bulbs can cause skin irritation. Handle with care and keep away from pets and children.

Discover These Helpful Guides for Further Reading

12 Top Performing Spring Bulbs that Come Back Year After Year!
Combining Tulips with Annuals and Perennials
Tulip Types

Recommended Companion Plants

Viola x wittrockiana (Pansy)
Narcissi (Daffodils)
Allium (Ornamental Onion)
Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)
Dicentra (Bleeding Heart)
Brunnera macrophylla (Siberian Bugloss)
Erythronium (Trout Lily)
Anemone blanda (Grecian Windflower)
Camassia (Camas)
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Tulipa (Tulip)
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While every effort has been made to describe these plants accurately, please keep in mind that height, bloom time, and color may differ in various climates. The description of these plants has been written based on numerous outside resources.

Guide Information

Hardiness 3 - 8
Heat Zones 1 - 8
Climate Zones 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24
Plant Type Bulbs
Genus Tulipa
Exposure Full Sun
Season of Interest Spring (Late)
Height 1' - 2'
(30cm - 60cm)
Spread 4" (10cm)
Spacing 4" (10cm)
Depth 7" (18cm)
Maintenance Low
Water Needs Average
Soil Type Chalk, Loam, Sand
Soil pH Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Soil Drainage Well-Drained
Characteristics Cut Flowers, Showy
Tolerance Deer, Rabbit
Landscaping Ideas Beds And Borders, Patio And Containers, Edging
Garden Styles City and Courtyard, Informal and Cottage
Compare All Tulipa (Tulip)
Compare Now
Explore Great Plant Combination Ideas
Tulipa (Tulip)
Guides with
Tulipa (Tulip)

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