Resembling a magnificent sunset, Dahlia 'Myrtle's Folly' is incredibly beautiful with its mix of gold, coral and rose petals, which twist and flick in the most terrific way. The flowers are large, up to 6-8 in. wide (15-20 cm), and quite spectacular atop the dark green foliage. This tall variety is excellent for cutting and combines easily with other plants in the perennial garden.

  • Blooming massively from July until Frost, this dahlia grows up to 40 in. tall (100 cm) and is an excellent choice to create a lovely garden display or for showing.
  • A great pick for borders or as cut flowers thanks to its superb vase life. Did you know that the more you cut Dahlia flowers, the more flowers you get? This makes Dahlias twice as nice: pretty in a vase, pretty in the garden. A great big flower in a vase or floating in a shallow bowl makes the perfect eye-catcher.
  • Best flowering occurs in full sun, but light shade will be welcomed in hot summer areas.
  • Provide consistent moisture during the growing season and do not allow soils dry out. Plant in a sheltered location to protect your dahlias from strong winds.
  • Best in groups of 5 for best visual effect. Deadhead spent flowers to promote growth of additional flower buds.
  • If you live in a cool area (hardiness zones 3-7) and you want to save your dahlia bulbs, or more precisely, your dahlia tubers for next spring, you may dig them up before the first frost and store them over winter before replanting them next spring. Store them in boxes, covered with moistened sand in a cool, dark, frost-free place where temperature remains between 45-50 °F (7-10°C).
  • This Dahlia is a member of the Decasplit Dahlias. The ends of their florets are split in two giving them a distinctive different look. Flower size approx. 5-6 in. (12-15 cm). Pictures and descriptions do not do justice to these flowers: you simply have to try them to fully appreciate them!

Dahlias come originally from Central and South America, particularly Mexico where they are the national flower. In their homeland, their natural habitats are cool moist mountain slopes. Their flowers were prized for their beauty early on, and the Aztecs used the tubers as a food crop as well as for medicinal purposes. Botanists who boarded the ships of the Spanish conquistadores discovered the imposing flower in the 17th century. Europeans first tested them as a food crop but soon admired them for their beautiful flowers. The plant was named in honor of A. Dahl, a Swedish botanist. This scientific name became so established that a common name for dahlias never took hold.
During the nineteenth century, the dahlia began stealing the hearts of people all over the world; today there are 20,000 different varieties. And every one is a descendent of one of the original species such as Dahlia rosea.