Tall and free-flowering, Kniphofia 'Tawny King' features bronzed stems bearing attractive terminal spikes of tubular, cream flowers gradually opening from tawny apricot buds. Native to South Africa, this eye-catching plant provides weeks of color from mid summer to early fall

  • Changing color as the flower matures, this robust, evergreen perennial displays the deepest shades in bud and fades as the flower opens, resulting in a bicolor look, adding interesting splashes of color to any sunny garden. The stout flowering scapes rise proudly above tufted clumps of narrow leaves.
  • Growing up to 4 ft. high (120 cm) with a spread of 3 ft. (90 cm), this Red Hot Poker enjoys a sturdy stem. However, some protection from strong winds would be recommended. 
  • Recipient of the prestigious Award of Garden Merit of the Royal Horticultural Society
  • This rhizomatous perennial performs best in full sun, in a sandy soil that has been enriched with humus. However, any deep, moist but well-drained soil will do. It can tolerate partial shade but flowering will be reduced. Good drainage is essential to prevent crown rot
  • Droughtdeer and rabbit tolerant, Kniphofias attract butterflies and are a favorite of hummingbirds.
  • Virtually disease free
  • Kniphofias provide interesting vertical accents in the garden, among other summer-blooming perennials. They look at their best with Achillea (yarrows), Helenium Autumnale (sneezeweed), Hemerocallis (daylilies) and Rudbeckia (coneflowers).
  • While primarily used in perennial borders, Red Hot Pokers are also well suited to naturalistic settings, water edges or exotic style combinations. Plant them in front of an evergreen background, or as a stand alone specimen - and be sure they will draw the attention of all onlookers. Never plant your Red Hot Pokers with their crown deeper than 3 in. (7 cm).
  • Remove spent flower spikes to encourage more bloom and protect their crowns in winter in hardiness 6.
  • The evergreen foliage tends to suffer in the winter months. You may want to tie foliage together in the fall to prevent water entering the crown of the plant. Alternatively, you may cut the foliage off at the base in late fall.
  • Should be planted in the spring or in the fall.
  • Can be propagated by division or be grown from seed. Division should be done in the spring or late fall