Create Your Garden

Jasmine: How to Grow and Care with Success

Common Jasmine, Poet's Jasmine, Arabian Jasmine, Spanish Jasmine, Royal Jasmine, Winter Jasmine, Pink Jasmine, White Jasmine, PrimroseJasmine, Angelwing Jasmine, Shining Jasmine

Jasmine, Poet's Jasmine, Arabian Jasmine, Spanish Jasmine, Royal Jasmine, Winter Jasmine, Pink Jasmine, White Jasmine, PrimroseJasmine, Angelwing Jasmine, Shining Jasmine

What is Jasmine?

Jasmine (Jasminum spp.) is a genus of fragrant, flowering plants that belongs to the Oleaceae family. It includes around species of deciduous and evergreen shrubs and vines, widely admired for their delicate, star-shaped flowers and enchanting scent.

Growth habit: Many species are climbing vines that can be trained to grow on trellises, arbors, pergolas, or fences, providing vertical interest in the garden.

Flowers: Jasmine flowers typically have five to nine petals and are shaped like a star, adding a delicate and elegant touch to gardens.

Fragrance: Jasmine is renowned for its captivating fragrance, which is often used in perfumes, essential oils, and aromatherapy. Jasmine essential oil, extracted from the flowers, is widely used in cosmetics, skincare products, and the fragrance industry.

Blooming season: The bloom time varies depending on the species, but most flowers typically bloom from late spring to early summer. Some species may continue to produce flowers intermittently throughout the summer and into early fall, while others may have a more concentrated blooming period.

Night-blooming: Some species, such as Jasminum sambac and Jasminum grandiflorum, bloom at night, releasing their intoxicating fragrance during the evening hours.

Ornamental Uses: Jasmine plants are valued not only for their fragrance but also for their ornamental appeal, which includes attractive foliage and flowers.  They can be trained to grow on trellises, arbors, or fences. They can also be grown in containers, making them suitable for patios, and balconies, or used as a ground cover to control soil erosion. Certain species, such as Jasminum sambac (Arabian jasmine), can be grown as indoor plants, providing year-round fragrance and beauty.

Tea: Jasmine flowers are often used to flavor and scent tea, particularly green tea, creating a delicate and aromatic infusion known as jasmine tea.

Medicinal: Some traditional medicine systems, such as Ayurveda and Chinese medicine, use jasmine for its purported health benefits, which include anti-inflammatory, sedative, and aphrodisiac properties.

Hardiness: Many varieties are suitable for USDA Hardiness Zones 7-10, while some can tolerate colder temperatures down to Zone 6 or even Zone 5 with adequate protection.

Guide Information

Hardiness 7 - 10
Plant Type Climbers, Shrubs
Genus Jasminum
Exposure Full Sun, Partial Sun
Season of Interest Spring (Early, Mid, Late)
Summer (Early, Mid, Late)
Fall
Winter
Maintenance Low
Water Needs Average
Soil Type Chalk, Loam, Sand
Soil pH Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Soil Drainage Moist but Well-Drained, Well-Drained
Characteristics Fragrant, Showy, Evergreen, Semi-Evergreen
Attracts Bees, Butterflies
Landscaping Ideas Arbors, Pergolas, Trellises, Beds And Borders, Ground Covers, Patio And Containers, Wall-Side Borders
Garden Styles City and Courtyard, Coastal Garden, Informal and Cottage
Jasminum nudiflorum (Winter Jasmine)
Jasminum officinale (Common Jasmine)
Jasminum sambac (Arabian Jasmine)

Why Should I Grow Jasmine?

Growing jasmine in your garden or home offers several benefits that can enhance both your outdoor and indoor spaces. Here are some reasons why you should consider growing this delightfully fragrant plant:

Fragrance: Jasmine is renowned for its enchanting and captivating scent. The fragrance can fill your garden or home, creating a pleasant and soothing atmosphere.

Aesthetic appeal: The plants produce delicate, star-shaped flowers that add elegance and beauty to any space. The attractive foliage and vining habit of some species can also provide visual interest and texture.

Versatility: Jasmine plants are suitable for various garden uses, such as climbing vines, ground covers, ornamental shrubs, or container plants. This versatility allows you to incorporate them into different garden styles and landscapes.

Attracts pollinators: The flowers are a nectar source for various pollinators, including bees and butterflies. By planting jasmine, you can support local pollinator populations and contribute to a healthy ecosystem.

Easy to grow: Many species are relatively low-maintenance and can tolerate a range of growing conditions, making them suitable for beginner gardeners or those with limited gardening experience.

Indoor gardening: Some species can be grown as houseplants, providing year-round beauty and fragrance for your indoor space. Jasmine plants grown indoors can also help purify the air and add a touch of nature to your home.

Medicinal and therapeutic uses: Jasmine has been used in traditional medicine systems for centuries, and its essential oil is often used in aromatherapy for its calming and stress-relieving properties.

Tea and culinary uses: The flowers are used to scent and flavor tea, creating a delicate and aromatic infusion known as jasmine tea. They can also be used as a garnish or in various culinary applications.

In summary, growing jasmine can provide you with a captivating fragrance, elegant flowers, and a versatile addition to your garden or home.

Jasmine, Jasminum, Fragrant Vine

Main Jasmine Types

There are several jasmine species that are commonly grown for their ornamental and fragrant qualities. Here are some of the main types:

Jasminum officinale (Common jasmine or Poet’s jasmine): This deciduous or semi-evergreen climbing vine produces clusters of fragrant white flowers from late spring to summer. It is often grown on trellises, arbors, or fences and is suitable for USDA Hardiness Zones 7-10.

Jasminum sambac (Arabian jasmine): Native to Southeast Asia, this evergreen shrub or vine is known for its intensely fragrant, waxy white flowers. It blooms intermittently throughout the year and is suitable for USDA Hardiness Zones 9-11. It can be grown as a houseplant in colder climates.

Jasminum grandiflorum (Spanish jasmine or Royal jasmine): This deciduous or semi-evergreen climber produces large, fragrant white flowers that bloom from summer to fall. It can be grown in USDA Hardiness Zones 9-10.

Jasminum nudiflorum (Winter jasmine): This deciduous, arching shrub is known for its bright yellow flowers that bloom in late winter to early spring before the foliage appears. It can be grown as a ground cover or trained to climb a support and is suitable for USDA Hardiness Zones 6-9.

Jasminum polyanthum (Pink jasmine or White jasmine): This evergreen or semi-evergreen vine is characterized by its clusters of fragrant, pink buds that open to white flowers. It blooms in late winter and spring and can be grown in USDA Hardiness Zones 9-10.

Jasminum mesnyi (Primrose jasmine): This evergreen or semi-evergreen shrub produces fragrant, bright yellow flowers in late winter and spring. It can be grown as a shrub, ground cover, or climbing plant and is suitable for USDA Hardiness Zones 8-10.

Jasminum nitidum (Angelwing jasmine or Shining jasmine): This evergreen vine or shrub produces clusters of fragrant, star-shaped white flowers with a purple underside. It blooms from spring to fall and can be grown in USDA Hardiness Zones 9-11.

These are just a few of the main types of jasmine commonly grown for their beauty and fragrance. When selecting a species for your garden, consider factors such as hardiness, growth habit, and desired use to choose the best option for your specific needs and preferences.

Jasminum mesnyi (Primrose Jasmine)
Jasminum polyanthum (Pink Jasmine)
Jasminum sambac ‘Grand Duke of Tuscany’ (Arabian Jasmine)

True Jasmine

Jasmine (Jasminum) and star jasmine (Trachelospermum) are two distinct types of plants that are often confused due to their similar appearance and fragrance. Here are some differences and similarities between the two:

True Jasmine (Jasminum):

  • Botanical family: True jasmine belongs to the Oleaceae (olive) family.
  • Origin: The plants are native to various regions, including Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.
  • Flowers: The flowers are typically white or yellow, with a tubular or trumpet-like shape. They are known for their sweet, intoxicating fragrance.
  • Growth habit: The plants can be shrubs or climbers, depending on the species. Climbing varieties usually require support structures, such as trellises or fences.
  • Common species: Some popular species include Jasminum officinale (common jasmine), Jasminum polyanthum (pink jasmine), and Jasminum sambac (Arabian jasmine).

Trachelospermum (Star Jasmine):

  • Botanical family: Trachelospermum belongs to the Apocynaceae (dogbane) family.
  • Origin: Star jasmine is native to eastern and southeastern Asia.
  • Flowers: The flowers are typically white, star-shaped, and smaller than true jasmine flowers. They also have a strong, sweet fragrance.
  • Growth habit: Trachelospermum is a climbing, twining evergreen vine, and it requires support structures to climb and spread.
  • Common species: The most common species is Trachelospermum jasminoides, which is often used as a ground cover, climbing plant, or container plant.

While both true jasmine and star jasmine plants produce sweet-smelling, white flowers, they belong to different botanical families and have distinct growth habits.

Trachelospermum asiaticum ‘Snow-N-Summer’ (Asiatic Jasmine)
Trachelospermum asiaticum (Asiatic Jasmine)
Trachelospermum jasminoides (Star Jasmine)

When to plant Jasmine

  • The best time to plant jasmine depends on your climate and the type of jasmine you are planting. Generally, the optimal time to plant jasmine is in early spring or fall when the temperatures are mild and the soil is workable.

Where to plant Jasmine

Choose a location in your garden or yard that provides the right growing conditions for the specific species you want to plant. In general, the plants prefer:

  • Sunlight: Most species thrive in full sun to partial shade. Around 4-6 hours of sunlight per day is ideal. Some species can tolerate more shade, but flowering may be reduced.
  • Soil: Jasmine prefers well-draining, fertile soil with a slightly acidic to neutral pH (6.0-7.0). Avoid planting this plant in areas with heavy clay or constantly soggy soil, as this can lead to root rot.
  • Space: Ensure there is enough space for the plant to grow and spread based on its mature size and growth habit. Climbing jasmine varieties will need support structures like trellises, arbors, or fences.

How to plant Jasmine

  • Prepare the planting site by removing any weeds, rocks, or debris. Amend the soil with organic matter, such as compost or well-rotted manure, to improve its fertility and drainage.
  • Dig a hole that is slightly larger than the root ball of your plant. The hole should be deep enough to allow the top of the root ball to sit at the same level as the surrounding soil.
  • Remove the plant from its container and gently loosen the roots if they are root-bound. Place the plant in the hole, ensuring the top of the root ball is level with the ground.
  • Fill the hole with soil, gently firming it around the roots to eliminate air pockets. Water the plant thoroughly to settle the soil and establish good root-to-soil contact.
  • If planting climbing jasmine, provide a support structure, such as a trellis, arbor, or fence, for the plant to climb.
  • Apply a layer of mulch around the base of the plant to help retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. Keep the mulch a few inches away from the stem to avoid rot.

Jasmine, Winter Jasmine, Jasminum nudiflorumWinter Jasmine (Jasminum nudiflorum)

Landscaping with Jasmine

Incorporating jasmine into your garden design can add fragrance, beauty, and an element of romance to your outdoor space. Here are some ideas for using it in various garden design styles and applications:

Climbing jasmine: Many species are climbing vines that can be trained to grow on trellises, arbors, pergolas, or fences. This can create a stunning focal point, a fragrant entrance, or a beautiful backdrop for other plants in your garden.

Cottage garden: Jasmine plants fit well in a cottage-style garden, where a mix of colorful and fragrant flowers creates a lush, informal atmosphere. Combine jasmine with other fragrant plants like roses, lavender, and lilacs for a sensory delight.

Garden borders: Plant jasmine shrubs along garden borders or pathways, where their fragrance and delicate flowers can be enjoyed up close. Pair them with complementary plants like salvia, echinacea, or Russian sage for added color and texture.

Ground cover: Some species, like Jasminum nudiflorum (winter jasmine), can be used as a ground cover, providing a fragrant carpet of color that suppresses weeds and controls soil erosion.

Container gardening: Grow jasmine plants in containers to add fragrance and elegance to patios, balconies, or other small outdoor spaces. Choose a large, well-draining container and provide a support structure, like a small trellis, if needed.

Espalier: Train jasmine plants to grow flat against a wall, fence, or trellis in an espalier pattern. This creates a unique and attractive design element while maximizing space in smaller gardens.

Vertical garden: Incorporate jasmine into a vertical garden by planting it alongside other climbing plants like clematis, honeysuckle, or climbing roses. This adds height and visual interest to your garden while making the most of limited space.

Moon garden: Create a moon garden by planting jasmine with other white or light-colored, night-blooming, and fragrant plants like moonflower, white roses, and gardenias. This type of garden is designed to be enjoyed during the evening hours when the enchanting fragrance and subtle colors are more noticeable.

Wildlife habitat: Jasmine plants can attract pollinators like bees and butterflies, so including them in a wildlife-friendly garden can support local ecosystems and create a more biodiverse environment.

Ipomoea alba (Moonflower)
Lonicera sempervirens (Trumpet Honeysuckle)
Clematis – Early Large-Flowered Group

How to Care

Jasmine plants are generally low-maintenance and easy to care for, but they do require some attention to ensure they grow well and produce abundant, fragrant flowers. Here are some essential care tips:

  • Watering: Jasmine plants prefer consistently moist but well-draining soil. Water regularly during the growing season, ensuring the soil does not dry out completely between waterings. Reduce the frequency of watering during winter or when the plant is dormant. Overwatering can lead to root rot, so it’s crucial to avoid waterlogged soil.
  • Fertilizing: To promote healthy growth and flowering, feed your jasmine plant with a balanced, slow-release fertilizer, such as a 10-10-10 formula, in early spring and again in midsummer.
  • Pruning: Prune jasmine plants after they finish blooming to maintain their shape, encourage bushier growth, and promote more prolific flowering. Remove any dead, damaged, or diseased branches as needed. For climbing jasmine varieties, train the vines to grow on their support structures and trim them to prevent excessive growth or tangling.
  • Mulching: Apply a layer of organic mulch, such as shredded bark, around the base of your jasmine plant to help retain soil moisture, suppress weeds, and regulate soil temperature. Keep the mulch a few inches away from the stem to avoid rot and pest issues.
  • Winter protection: Some jasmine species are more cold-sensitive than others. If you live in a colder climate, protect your jasmine plant from freezing temperatures by moving container-grown plants indoors, applying a layer of mulch, or wrapping the plant in protective materials like burlap or frost cloth.

By providing your plant with the appropriate care and attention, you can enjoy its enchanting fragrance and beautiful flowers for years to come.

Jasmine, Jasminum sambac, Arabien JasmineArabian Jasmine (Jasminum sambac)

Growing Jasmine as a Houseplant

Growing jasmine as a houseplant allows you to enjoy its beautiful flowers and enchanting fragrance indoors. Here are the steps to plant and care for jasmine as a houseplant:

  • Choose the right jasmine variety: Some species are better suited for indoor cultivation. Jasminum polyanthum (pink jasmine) and Jasminum sambac (Arabian jasmine) are two popular varieties for growing indoors.
  • Select a suitable pot: Choose a pot with drainage holes to prevent waterlogging. The pot should be large enough to accommodate the jasmine’s root system and allow for some growth.
  • Prepare the potting mix: Use a well-draining, high-quality potting mix that is rich in organic matter. You can make your own by combining equal parts of peat moss, perlite, and compost or well-aged manure.
  • Plant the jasmine: Gently remove the plant from its nursery container, being careful not to damage the roots. Place the plant in the new pot, ensuring that the top of the root ball is level with the top of the potting mix. Fill the remaining space around the root ball with the potting mix, and press down gently to eliminate air pockets.
  • Water the plant: Water the plant thoroughly after planting, allowing the excess water to drain through the holes in the bottom of the pot. This will help the potting mix settle and ensure proper root contact with the soil.
  • Provide a support structure: Many varieties are climbing plants, so providing a small trellis, stake, or hoop within the pot will help support the plant as it grows. Gently attach the plant to the support using soft plant ties or clips.
  • Position the plant: Place the potted jasmine in a bright location with indirect sunlight, such as an east or west-facing window. Jasmine plants need at least 4-6 hours of bright, indirect light each day for optimal growth and flowering.
  • Maintain proper care: Jasmine houseplants require consistent care to thrive indoors. Water the plant regularly to keep the soil evenly moist but not waterlogged, and reduce watering during the winter months. Maintain indoor temperatures between 60-75°F (15-24°C) and provide adequate humidity by placing the pot on a tray filled with water and pebbles or by using a humidifier.
  • Fertilize the plant: Feed your jasmine houseplant with a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer every 4-6 weeks during the growing season. Follow the package instructions for the proper application rates.
  • Prune and shape: Prune the plant after it finishes blooming to maintain its shape and encourage bushier growth. Regularly check for pests and diseases, treating any issues promptly.

With proper care and attention, your houseplant can thrive and provide you with beautiful, fragrant blooms to enjoy indoors.

How to Propagate

There are two primary methods for propagating jasmine plants: stem cuttings and layering. Both methods can yield healthy new plants with proper care and technique.

Stem Cuttings:

  • Choose the right time: The best time to take stem cuttings for jasmine propagation is in early summer or late spring when the plant is actively growing and the stems are semi-ripe.
  • Select a stem: Look for a healthy, disease-free stem with at least 3-4 nodes. Cut a 4-6 inch (10-15 cm) long stem section just below a node using clean, sharp pruning shears.
  • Prepare the cutting: Remove the leaves from the lower half of the cutting to expose the nodes. You can also trim the remaining leaves by half to reduce transpiration.
  • Rooting hormone (optional): Dip the cut end of the stem in rooting hormone powder to encourage faster root development. This step is optional but can improve the chances of successful propagation.
  • Plant the cutting: Fill a pot or container with a well-draining, moist potting mix or a mix of peat moss and perlite. Insert the cut end of the stem into the potting medium, burying at least one node below the surface.
  • Create a humid environment: Cover the pot with a clear plastic bag or place it in a propagation chamber to maintain high humidity. Make sure the plastic doesn’t touch the cutting by using stakes or a wireframe.
  • Provide light and warmth: Place the pot in a warm location with bright, indirect light. Avoid direct sunlight, which can overheat the cutting and cause it to wilt.
  • Monitor and care for the cutting: Keep the potting medium consistently moist but not soggy. In 4-6 weeks, the cutting should develop roots. You can check for root growth by gently tugging on the cutting; if it resists, roots have likely formed.
  • Transplant: Once the cutting has a well-developed root system, transplant it to a larger pot or its final location in the garden.

Layering:

  • Select a flexible, healthy stem: Choose a long, healthy stem that can be bent down to reach the soil surface.
  • Prepare the stem: Make a small, upward-slanting cut about one-third of the way through the stem at a point near the middle of the stem’s length. This cut should be made just below a node.
  • Encourage rooting: Apply rooting hormone to the cut (optional) and gently bend the stem down, ensuring the cut portion is in contact with the soil.
  • Secure the stem: Use a U-shaped wire or a small rock to hold the stem in place, with the cut portion buried slightly in the soil.
  • Provide ongoing care: Keep the soil around the layered stem consistently moist. Over time, roots will develop at the cut site.
  • Sever and transplant: Once a healthy root system has formed (usually after a few months), sever the stem from the parent plant and carefully transplant the newly rooted jasmine plant to its final location.

Using either stem cuttings or layering, you can successfully propagate jasmine plants and enjoy their beauty and fragrance in more areas of your garden or share them with friends and family.

Jasmine teaJasmine tea: some potential benefits of jasmine tea include stress relief, improved heart health, weight loss, improved digestion, and immune system boosting.

Pests and Diseases

Jasmine can be affected by several pests and diseases. It’s essential to monitor your plants regularly and take action to control any issues that arise. Here are some common pests and diseases that can affect the plants:

Aphids: These small, sap-sucking insects can cause yellowing and curling of leaves, reduced growth, and poor flowering. To control aphids, use insecticidal soap, neem oil, or a strong spray of water to dislodge them from the plant.

Spider mites: These tiny, spider-like pests can cause stippling, yellowing, or bronzing of the leaves. Severe infestations can lead to leaf drop and plant death. Control spider mites by spraying the plant with insecticidal soap, neem oil, or horticultural oil, and maintain adequate humidity levels around the plant.

Mealybugs: These small, cottony insects can cause stunted growth, yellowing of leaves, and sooty mold. Control mealybugs by dabbing them with a cotton swab soaked in rubbing alcohol, spraying the plant with insecticidal soap, or releasing natural predators like ladybugs or lacewings.

Root rot: Overwatering or poor drainage can lead to root rot, a fungal disease that causes yellowing, wilting, and drooping of leaves, as well as plant death. To prevent root rot, ensure your jasmine is planted in well-draining soil and avoid overwatering.

Rust: Rust is a fungal disease that causes orange or reddish-brown pustules on the undersides of leaves, leading to yellowing and premature leaf drop. To control rust, remove infected leaves, provide good air circulation, and apply a fungicide labeled for rust control.

Prevention is key when it comes to managing pests and diseases. Maintain proper cultural practices, such as regular watering, proper fertilization, pruning, and good air circulation, to keep your plants healthy and better able to resist pests and diseases.

Frequently Asked Questions

What does jasmine symbolize?

Jasmine symbolizes various positive attributes across different cultures. In general, it represents love, beauty, sensuality, and purity. In some regions, like India, it’s associated with spirituality, divine hope, and even good luck. Jasmine flowers are often used in wedding ceremonies and religious rituals, symbolizing the deep connection between the physical and spiritual realms.

Is jasmine easy to grow?

Jasmine is relatively easy to grow, provided you meet its basic growing requirements. It needs well-draining soil, bright but indirect sunlight, and regular watering to maintain consistent moisture. Some jasmine species can withstand cooler temperatures, while others prefer warmer climates.

What does jasmine smell like

Jasmine has a sweet, rich, and intoxicating floral fragrance that’s often described as exotic, warm, and sensual. The scent can be quite strong, especially during the evening and night when the flowers release their aroma to attract pollinators like moths. The distinctive fragrance of jasmine is highly prized and widely used in perfumes, essential oils, and other fragrance products.

What is jasmine tea good for?

Jasmine tea, typically made by blending green tea leaves with jasmine blossoms, is known for its potential health benefits due to the presence of antioxidants and other beneficial compounds. Some potential benefits of jasmine tea include stress relief, improved heart health, weight loss, improved digestion, and immune system boosting.

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While every effort has been made to describe these plants accurately, please keep in mind that height, bloom time, and color may differ in various climates. The description of these plants has been written based on numerous outside resources.

Guide Information

Hardiness 7 - 10
Plant Type Climbers, Shrubs
Genus Jasminum
Exposure Full Sun, Partial Sun
Season of Interest Spring (Early, Mid, Late)
Summer (Early, Mid, Late)
Fall
Winter
Maintenance Low
Water Needs Average
Soil Type Chalk, Loam, Sand
Soil pH Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Soil Drainage Moist but Well-Drained, Well-Drained
Characteristics Fragrant, Showy, Evergreen, Semi-Evergreen
Attracts Bees, Butterflies
Landscaping Ideas Arbors, Pergolas, Trellises, Beds And Borders, Ground Covers, Patio And Containers, Wall-Side Borders
Garden Styles City and Courtyard, Coastal Garden, Informal and Cottage
Compare All Jasminum (Jasmine)
Compare Now
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Jasminum (Jasmine)

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